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People at the Raid on Deerfield: Brief Biographies

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The following people were all involved in the raid. Some were attackers who were either killed, or survived to march the captives northward. Others were Deerfield inhabitants who were killed, or survived to escape or be taken captive. While not everyone has his or her full story told on this website, they are all briefly mentioned here.

 

David Alexander

David Alexander arrived in Deerfield from Northampton, MA, around 1700. He had married Elizabeth Copley Turner, the widow of Praisever Turner, sometime after 1683. She died around 1701and David then married Mary Weld on July 31, 1701. David was killed during the 1704 attack and Mary was taken captive and later redeemed.

Joseph Alexander

Joseph was born in 1681. He was captured during the 1704 attack but escaped the first night. He married in 1705, moved away from Deerfield around 1716 and died Sept. 30, 1761.

Mary Weld Alexander

Mary was the daughter of Daniel and Mary Hinsdale Weld. She was born on Mar. 30, 1667. She married David Alexander on July 31, 1701, and together they had a daughter named Mary, born on April 11, 1702. Mrs. Alexander was captured during the 1704 attack and was redeemed. Her daughter was killed during the attack. On April 18, 1707, Mrs. Alexander married Samuel Smead, with whom she had four living children. She then married Joseph Younglove on Nov. 28, 1734.

Mary Alexander (Jr.)

Mary was born on April 11,1702, to Mary and David Alexander. She was killed in 1704 during the march to Canada.

Sarah Allen

Sarah Allen was born on May 1, 1692, to Edward and Mercy Painter Allen. She was captured during the 1704 attack and was married in Canada in 1710. She never returned.

John Allen

John was born in 1659. On Feb. 22, 1682, he married Elizabeth Prichard and they had 6 children who lived to adulthood. They moved to Deerfield around 1685. During the 1704 attack their daughter, Sarah, was captured but the rest of the family escaped harm. Both John and his wife were killed on May 11 of 1704, during an attack on the Bars section of Deerfield.

Elizabeth Prichard Allen

Elizabeth was the daughter of William Prichard. She married John Allen on Feb. 22, 1682, and around 1685, they moved to Deerfield. Elizabeth, John and five of their six children escaped harm during the 1704 attack, but her daughter, Sarah, was captured. Elizabeth died on May 11, 1704, during an attack on the Bars section of Deerfield.

Mary Allis

Mary Allis was the daughter of Samuel and Alice Allis. She was born July 6, 1682. She was taken captive in the 1704 raid on Deerfield and was redeemed. On Feb. 3, 1710, Mary married Nathaniel Brooks, himself a redeemed captive from the same raid. Together they had six children.

Samuel Allis (Jr.)

Samuel was the son of Samuel and Alice Allis. He was born on Feb. 20, 1679, and killed on Feb. 29, 1704.

Thomas Baker

Thomas Baker was a soldier from Northampton who was stationed in Deerfield. He was captured during the 1704 attack and after several attempts he managed to escape in 1705.

Ensign Francois-Marie Margane de Batilly, 1672-1704

Thirty-two-year-old Francois-Marie Margane de Batilly was an ensign in the French troupes de la marine. He was mortally wounded during the 1704 raid on Deerfield while leading one of several coordinated assaults on Benoni Stebbins' house.

Simon Beamon

Simon was born in 1656. He married Hannah Barnard on Oct. 9, 1680. During the 1704 attack his home was burned and he, his wife and servant were captured. Both Beamons were redeemed. Simon died in Feb. or Mar. of 1712.

Hannah Barnard Beamon

Hannah Beamon was the daughter of Francis and Hannah Marvin Barnard. She was born around 1646 and her parents were among the first settlers of Deerfield in 1673. She taught dame school and was a widow when she married Simon Beamon on Oct. 9, 1680. The Beamons lost their home and were both captured during the 1704 attack. Both were redeemed and Hannah died on May 13, 1739.

Hepzibah Buel Belding

Hepzibah Buel married Daniel Belding on Feb. 17, 1699. He was a widower with nine living children. Two of these children were already captives from a 1696 raid on Deerfield. Hepzibah was captured during the 1704 raid and killed on the journey to Canada.

Daniel Belding

Daniel Belding was born in 1648 in Hartford, CT, and came to Deerfield in 1686. With his first wife he had 12 living children. On Sept. 16, 1696, Deerfield was attacked and three of his children and his wife were killed, 2 children were wounded and two were taken captive. On Feb. 17, 1699, he married Hepzibah Buel. She was captured and killed during the 1704 raid. His third wife was Sarah Hawks Mattoon. Daniel Belding died on Aug. 14, 1731.

Robert Boltwood

Robert Boltwood of Hadley, MA, was one of the militia garrisoned in Deerfield. He was the son of Samuel and Sarah Lewis Boltwood of Farmington, CT. Both he and his father, Samuel, were killed in the attack.

Samuel Boltwood

Sergeant Samuel Boltwood, fifty-three years old, was one of five garrison soldiers who died in the Deerfield attack and one of two killed in the Meadows Fight north of the village. His son Robert was also killed in the Deerfield raid.

John Bridgman

John, or Jonathan, Bridgman was from Sunderland. He married John Sheldon's sister, Mary, on Jan. 11, 1670. He was captured during the 1704 attack but escaped in the meadows. He died on July 21, 1747.

Nathaniel Brooks

Nathaniel Brooks was born in 1664. His death date is unknown. He was married to Mary Williams and by 1704, had 2 children. During the 1704 attack, the Brooks home was burned and the entire family was taken captive. His wife was killed on the trek north. His daughter stayed with the French and nothing is known of his son beyond his capture.

In 1706, Nathaniel returned to Deerfield, thanks to the efforts of John Sheldon. Although Nathaniel traveled to Canada in 1707 seeking the return of his children, he was unsuccessful. On Feb. 3, 1710, he married Mary Allis, herself a redeemed captive from the Deerfield raid. Together they had six more children.

Mary Williams Brooks

Mary was the daughter of Zebediah and Mary Miller Williams. She was born on Dec. 24, 1673, and married Nathaniel Brooks. By 1704, she had a son and a daughter. During the 1704 attack, the Brooks home was burned and the entire family was taken captive. On the eighth day of the trek north Mrs. Brooks suffered a miscarriage from a fall on the ice and was slain the following day by her captor. Her daughter stayed with the French. Her son's fate following his capture remains unknown.

Mary Brooks (Jr.)

Mary was the oldest child of Nathaniel and Mary Williams Brooks. She was born on Aug. 16, 1696. During the 1704 attack, the Brooks home was burned and the entire family was taken captive. Her mother was slain on the ninth day of the march. Mary stayed with Monsieur de Fleury in Canada. She was baptized into the Catholic faith on July 19, 1705, and her name was changed to Marie Claire. In 1710 she was granted Canadian citizenship and she spent the rest of her life in Canada.

William Brooks

William was the second child of Nathaniel and Mary Williams Brooks, born on Dec. 12, 1698. During the 1704 attack, the Brooks home was burned and the entire family was taken captive. His mother was killed on the journey north. William's sister remained with the French for the rest of her life. Nothing further is known of William beyond his capture. His father returned to Deerfield in 1706, remarried and fathered six more children.

Abigail Brown

Abigail was the daughter of James and Remembrance Brooks Brown. She was born on Sept. 23, 1678. She was captured and redeemed in 1704 and on Dec. 31, 1714, Abigail married John Smead.

Benjamin Burt

Benjamin Burt was a blacksmith. He was born in 1680 and married Sarah Belding in 1702. He and his pregnant wife were taken captive in the 1704 raid, along with his brother, John. His son, Christopher, was born on Apr. 14, 1704, on the march to Canada. The Burt family was redeemed and Seaborn was born on July 4, 1706, on the ship that brought them home. The family eventually moved to CT and Benjamin Burt died on May 20, 1759.

Sarah Belding Burt

Sarah Belding was born on Mar. 15, 1682, to Daniel and Elizabeth Foote Belding. When Deerfield was attacked on Sept. 16, 1696, she was unharmed, but her mother and 3 siblings were killed, two were wounded and two were taken captive. Sarah married Benjamin Burt in 1702. Both were taken captive during the 1704 raid and she gave birth to her first child on the journey to Canada. In 1706, the Burts were redeemed and her second child was born on the return voyage. Sarah's death date is unknown.

John Burt

John was the youngest child of David and Mary Holton Burt. He was born on Apr. 29, 1682, and was captured during the 1704 raid. John Sheldon redeemed him in Aug. of 1706. He was killed by Native American warriors while scouting along the Connecticut River In May of 1709.

Samuel Carter

Samuel Carter was born in London, England, around 1665. He was among the first to settle in Deerfield. On Dec. 4, 1690, he married Mercy Brooks and they had six children before she died on Jan. 22, 1700. He then married Hannah Weller On July 1, 1701, and by 1704 had added one more child to the family. Carter was absent during the 1704 attack on Deerfield. He returned to find his wife and three children killed and four children carried captive to Canada. In 1705 he moved to Norwalk, CT, and in 1706 he married Lois Stenton. In 1708 his last child was born.

Hannah Weller Carter

Hannah was the daughter of John and Mary Weller. She was born on May 14, 1674, and married Samuel Carter on July 1, 1701, when she also took on the care of Samuel's six children from his first marriage. She and Samuel had one living child together, named Hannah. Mrs. Carter was killed on the 5th day of the march to Canada.

Samuel Carter (Jr.)

Samuel was the son of Samuel and Mercy Brooks Carter. He was born on Mar. 1, 1692, and was captured during the 1704 attack. He never returned and nothing more is known about him.

Mercy Carter

Mercy was born on Dec. 17, 1693, to Samuel and Mercy Brooks Carter. She was taken captive during the 1704 attack on Deerfield and adopted into a family in the Kanienkehaka village of Kahnawake. Eventually she married someone from that village. There is a story that two of her sons were sent to Deerfield to see where their mother was born.

When Mercy's father died in 1728, he promised her 100 pounds if she and her family would live in Norwalk, CT, for ten years. This is where he had settled in 1706. She chose not to do this, however, the two sons who were sent to Deerfield also visited Mercy's brother Ebenezer, in Ct, in 1751.

John Carter

John was the second son born to Samuel and Mercy Brooks Carter. He was born on Jan. 22, 1695, and was taken captive during the 1704 raid. John's new home was in Pointe-aux-Trembles, near Montreal, and his new name became Jean Chartier. In 1710 he was granted Canadian citizenship. The Reverend John Williams and Colonel Stoddard visited him in 1714, and he told them he greatly wished to return to Deerfield, but when the governor of Canada later asked him if he wished to be redeemed, he had changed his mind. In 1718 John was granted land in Riviere-des-Prairies and married Marie Courtemanche on Oct. 27 of that same year. Together they had eleven children.

John's father died in 1728 and willed him 500 pounds if he would live in New England for the rest of his life. He did not do this but he did visit his brother, Ebenezer, twice, once in 1736 and again in 1751. John died on Aug. 4, 1772.

Ebenezer Carter

Ebenezer Carter was born on Sept. 9, 1697, to Samuel and Mercy Brooks Carter. He was captured during the 1704 raid and was redeemed for twenty-four pounds in 1707. He lived with his father in Norwalk, CT, until he later settled in New Canaan, CT. In 1721 he married Hannah St. John and they had seven children. In 1751, two of his sister Mercy's sons came to visit him. Ebenezer died in July of 1774.

Thomas Carter

Thomas was the fourth son of Samuel and Mercy Brooks Carter. He was born on Oct. 6, 1699, and was killed during the 1704 attack on Deerfield.

Marah Carter

Marah Carter was born on Jan. 22, 1701, to Samuel and Mercy Brooks Carter. She was killed on Feb. 29, 1704.

Hannah Carter (Jr.)

Hannah was the daughter of Samuel and Hannah Weller Carter. She was born on July 8, 1703, and died in 1704, on the second day of the march to Canada.

Joseph Catlin

Joseph was the son of John and Mary Baldwin Catlin. Joseph was twenty-three at the time of the 1704 raid. He was one of the seven men who defended Benoni Stebbins' house, and one of nine soldiers killed in the Meadows Fight. Joseph's wife, Hannah, was wounded in the attack. His father and brother Jonathan were killed. Two siblings were taken captive and redeemed.

John Catlin

John Catlin was from Wethersfield, CT. He was born around 1643, and married Mary Baldwin on Sept. 23, 1662. They settled in Deerfield soon after 1683. During the 1704 attack he and one son were killed when their home was burned. One son was killed in the fight in the meadows, and four children were captured. Two of these were killed on the march north. Although his wife was unharmed, she died in April following the attack.

Mary Baldwin Catlin

Mary was the daughter of Joseph Baldwin of CT. She married John Catlin on Sept 23, 1662, and they moved to Deerfield around 1683. By 1704, they were the parents of nine living children, four of whom were living at home. Mary was left unharmed during the 1704 attack because she offered water to a dying French soldier but she died, it is said of grief, in April of 1704. Her husband and one son were killed when their home was burned. Another son was killed during the fight in the meadow and four children were captured.

John Catlin (Jr.)

John was born on Jan. 8, 1687, to John and Mary Baldwin Catlin. He was captured during the 1704 attack and redeemed in 1706. He married and had twelve children, and died on Dec. 1, 1766.

Jonathan Catlin

Jonathan was the son of John and Mary Baldwin Catlin. His birth date is unknown. He perished along with his father when their home was burned during the 1704 attack.

Ruth Catlin

Ruth was born around 1684 to John and Mary Baldwin Catlin. She was captured, and along the journey to Canada it is said that she showed great courage by throwing off a heavy pack that she had been forced to carry. Her captors were impressed by this behavior and did not kill her. She was redeemed in 1707.

Elizabeth Catlin Corse

Elizabeth was the daughter of John and Mary Baldwin Catlin. She married James Corse around 1690. They had three children and he died on May 15, 1696. She was taken captive and killed on the trek north.

Elizabeth Corse (Jr.)

Elizabeth was born to James and Elizabeth Catlin Corse on Feb. 4, 1696. She was captured during the 1704 attack and taken to Canada where she lived with the Roy family until she married Jean Dumontel in 1712. Together they had five living children and then following Jean's death, she married Pierre Monet on Jan. 19, 1730. With Pierre she had another seven children. She remained in Canada for the rest of her life.

Charles Legardeur de Croisille

Charles Legardeur de Croisille was twenty-seven years old when he joined the expedition against Deerfield in 1704. A member of the troupes de la marine and a member of one of New France's noble families, he served again under Lieutenant Hertel de Rouville in an unsuccessful raid on the Massachusetts Bay colony town of Haverhill in 1708. The following year, he married Marie-Anne-Geneviève. His subsequent military career was lackluster—he was not promoted to Lieutenant until age fifty-one. He served for several years at Fort St. Frédéric on Lake Champlain and received the Cross of St. Louis in acknowledgment of his long military service. Charles was sixty-three when he died in 1749.

Daniel Crowfoot

Daniel was the son of Samuel Crowfoot of Hadley, MA. His mother, Mary Warner Crowfoot, had died in 1702, when he was about a year old. It is thought that Daniel was living with her brother Ebenezer in Deerfield because Samuel had not yet remarried. Daniel was taken captive in 1704 but his fate following his capture is unknown.

Jacques de Noyon

Jacques de Noyon was born in Trois-Rivieres in New France in 1668. A French fur trader and explorer, De Noyon flouted the French government's authority by engaging in illegal trade with the English in furs. De Noyon probably arrived in Deerfield about 1702 or 1703. Known as Denio rather than De Noyon, he married 17-year-old Abigail Stebbins of Deerfield shortly after his arrival. Jacques was 36 years old when he and his English wife fell into French hands during the raid. Both survived the arduous journey north, and Jacques headed west on a fur trading expedition almost immediately after arriving in New France. He became a sergeant in the French troupes de la marine and was probably stationed in Detroit and at Fort Frontenac. Jacques and Abigail had twelve children, the last born in 1726. Jacques de Noyon died at the age of 77 in 1745.

Abigail Stebbins De Noyon

Abigail was born in 1687 to John and Dorothy Alexander Stebbins. She married Jacques De Noyon, a Frenchman from Canada, on Feb. 3, 1704, just three weeks before the attack on Deerfield. They were both captured and resettled in Boucherville, Quebec. Abigail had twelve living children but little is known of any except Rene, who was the oldest. At around age ten he was sent to meet his mother's parents and see her birthplace. Although this was supposed to be a visit, he remained in Deerfield and eventually changed his name to Aaron Denio.

Sarah Dickinson

Sarah Dickinson was captured in 1704 and redeemed, but it is unclear exactly who she was. She may have been the daughter of Samuel and Martha Bridgman Dickinson. This Sarah was born in 1675, and died unmarried in 1750.

Joseph Eastman

Joseph was born in 1683 to Joseph and Mary Tilton Eastman. It is said that he was a student living with the Reverend Williams and his family. Joseph was captured and redeemed in 1707. He married, had eleven children, and died in 1769.

John Field

John was born in 1673 and married Mary Bennett in 1696. During the 1704 attack he participated in the attack in the meadows immediately following the captures. His wife and two children were captured and one child was killed. Mrs. Field returned in 1706 and the family moved to CT in 1707, where they had three more children.

Mary Bennett Field

Mary was the daughter of James Bennett of Northampton, MA. She married John Field on Nov. 9,1696, and by 1704 they had three children. During the attack she and two children were captured and her youngest child was killed. Mrs. Field was redeemed in 1706.

Mary Field (Jr.)

Mary was born to John and Mary Bennett Field in 1697. During the 1704 attack she was captured and eventually adopted into a Native American family. Her new name was Walahowey. Although she and her husband came to Massachusetts to visit her relatives, nothing could convince her to stay.

John Field (Jr.)

John was the oldest son of John and Mary Bennett Field. He was born on Oct. 4, 1700, was captured in 1704, was redeemed and eventually moved to Tolland, CT.

Sarah Field

Sarah was born on April 14, 1703, to John and Mary Bennett Field. She was killed during the 1704 attack.

Marguerite Field

Marguerite was the daughter of Thomas and Mary Price Field. Marguerite was probably the name given to her in Canada. She was captured from Deerfield in 1704 and married Jean Sere on June 7, 1722. With him she had two children. She eventually married two more times and had six more living children. It is possible that she was staying with John Field's family when captured. John was her father's cousin. Marguerite died in Canada in 1741.

Samuel Foot

Samuel Foot, of Hatfield, MA was about twenty-six years old. He was one of nine soldiers killed in the Meadows Fight, in pursuit of the retreating French and Indians.

Frank

Frank was an African slave owned by the Reverend John Williams. Nothing is known of Frank before his arrival in Deerfield. He was taken captive in the 1704 raid. His wife Parthena, who also belonged to the minister, was killed early in the attack. a second slave belonging to the Reverend. Frank was slain by his captors on the first night of captivity. He was the only adult male captive killed outright on the march north.

Mary Daniels Frary

Mary Daniels married Samson Frary on June 14, 1660. They had three living children. On Feb. 29, 1704, Mary was captured and later killed on the trek to Canada.

Samson Frary

Samson Frary settled in Deerfield around 1669-1670. He married Mary Daniels on June 14, 1660. During the 1704 attack his wife was captured and later killed and he was killed during the attack. His three grown children were unharmed.

Thomas French

Thomas was born in 1657 and married Mary Catlin on Oct. 18, 1683. They had six living children by 1704. Thomas was captured in 1704 and later redeemed. His wife was captured and killed on the march to Canada. Five of his children were captured and the youngest was killed. Thomas returned to Deerfield and married Hannah Edwards Stebbins on Feb. 16, 1709. He died on Apr. 3, 1733.

Mary Catlin French

Mary Catlin was the first wife of Thomas French. She was the daughter of John and Mary Baldwin Catlin. She married Thomas on Oct. 18, 1683, and together they had six living children. During the 1704 attack, she, her husband and five children were captured and one child was killed. Her husband and two children were eventually redeemed but Mary was killed on the journey to Canada.

Hannah Edwards Stebbins French

Hannah was the widow of Joseph Edwards when she married the widower Benoni Stebbins in 1691. He had six children from his previous marriage and together they had two more. She and Benoni and at least five other adults defended her home as best they could during the 1704 attack, but Benoni was killed in the house. Hannah was unharmed and married Thomas French on Feb. 16, 1709. She died on Sept. 7, 1735.

Freedom French

Freedom was born to Thomas and Mary Catlin French on Nov. 20, 1692. She was captured and taken to live with Jacques Le Be in Canada. She was given the name of Marie Francoise. On Feb. 6, 1713, she married Jean Daveluy. They had six living children.

Mary French (Jr.)

Mary was the oldest daughter of Thomas and Mary Catlin French. She was born on Nov. 9, 1686 and was taken captive during the 1704 attack. She was redeemed and in 1711, married Jonathan King of Northampton. She died in 1758 in CT.

Martha French

Martha was born on May 12, 1695, to Thomas and Mary Catlin French. She was captured during the 1704 attack and probably spent her first few years with the Native Americans. By 1707 she was living with the Sisters of the Congregation of Notre Dame in Villemarie, Quebec. Her name was changed to Marguerite and on Nov. 24, 1711, she married Jacques Roi who was from St. Lambert, Quebec. With him, Martha had six children who lived to adulthood. Some time after that Jacques died. In 1733, her youngest child died and on May 4 of that same year she took Jean-Louis Menard as her second husband. She had three more children with him.

Abigail French

Abigail was Thomas and Mary Catlin French's youngest daughter. She was born on Feb. 28, 1698, and was captured during the 1704 attack. The Kanien'kehaka town of Kahnawake became her new home and she spent the rest of her life there. Abigail never married.

John French

John was the youngest child of Thomas and Mary Catlin French. He was an infant, having been born on Feb. 1, 1704, and he was killed during the attack.

Thomas French (Jr.)

Thomas was born on Nov. 2, 1689. He was captured in the 1704 attack on Deerfield and was redeemed. He married Joanna Field of Sunderland, MA, on June 11, 1713. They had five children who reached adulthood. Three other children died of illness within days of each other in Oct. of 1727. Thomas died on July 26, 1759.

Mary Harris

Mary Harris was born in Springfield, MA in 1695. When her father died, Mary's mother placed her in the Deerfield home of Simon and Hannah Beaman as a servant. She was nine years old when captured. She married a Native American from Kahnawake and had at least two sons. Mary lived in Ohio for a while, and a branch of the Muskingum River there was called "White Woman's Creek" after her. It is now called the Walhonding River. By 1756 she was again in Kahnawake. When asked as an adult if she wished to return to New England, she said "No."

Samuel Hastings

Samuel was born on Mar. 15, 1685. He may have been a soldier stationed in Deerfield. He was taken captive on Feb. 29, 1704, and taken to Cap St. Ignatius in Canada. At his baptism he was renamed Joseph. It is believed that he eventually returned to New England sometime after 1710.

John Hawks

John was the son of John and Martha Baldwin Hawks. He was born in 1673. In 1695 he married Thankful Smead and they had three living children. He and his entire family were killed during the attack.

Thankful Smead Hawks

Thankful was the daughter of Elizabeth and William Smead. She was born on May 13, 1677, and married John Hawks around 1695. They had three living children, all of whom perished along with John and Thankful, on Feb. 29, 1704.

John Hawks (Jr.)

John was born on June 6, 1696, to John and Thankful Smead Hawks. He died along with his whole family during the 1704 attack.

Martha Hawks

Martha was the oldest daughter born to John and Thankful Smead Hawks on Oct. 4, 1699. She died on Feb. 29, 1704, along with the rest of her family.

Thankful Hawks (Jr.)

Thankful was the daughter of John and Thankful Smead Hawks. She was born on Nov. 18, 1701, and was killed with the rest of her family during the 1704 attack.

Elizabeth Hawks

Elizabeth was the daughter of Sgt. John and Alice Allis Hawks. She was born on Sept. 22, 1697, and was captured in 1704 and killed on the march north to Canada.

John Hawks (Sgt.)

Sgt. John Hawks was born in 1643. On Dec. 26, 1667, he married Martha Baldwin and they had one surviving child. They arrived in Deerfield prior to 1675 and Martha died in 1676. John took Alice Allis, the widow of Samuel Allis, as his second wife on Nov. 20, 1696, and they had one daughter who was killed on the march to Canada following the attack. Following the 1704 attack, John moved to Waterbury, CT and lived there with his daughter.

Alice Allis Hawks

Alice was the widow of Samuel Allis when she married Sgt. John Hawks on Nov. 20, 1696. She had seven children by Samuel, all of whom were in their teens or older by 1704. With John Hawks she had one daughter who was killed on the march north following the 1704 attack. Alice and two of her children from her previous marriage were also killed during that same attack.

Jacob Hickson

According to Stephen Williams, Jacob Hickson was a soldier. He was captured by the Abenaki during the 1704 attack and died of starvation in VT, while still being held captive.

Mehuman Hinsdale

Born in 1673, Mehuman had the distinction of being the first white man born in Deerfield. With his wife, Mary, they had one living child by 1704. During the attack Mehuman and his wife were captured and his child was killed. Mehuman was redeemed in Aug. of 1706. In 1709 he was captured again. This time he had to travel through both France and England before returning home in 1712. He died on May 9, 1736.

Mary Hinsdale

Mary was the wife of Mehuman Hinsdale. She was captured during the 1704 attack along with her husband. Their only child was killed. Mary was redeemed, and following Mehuman's death in 1736, she married George Beal on Apr. 2, 1742, and died a widow on Jan 7, 1763, in Hinsdale, NH.

Samuel Hinsdale

Samuel Hinsdale was the son of Mehuman and Mary Hinsdale. He was born on Nov. 12, 1702, and was killed on Feb. 29, 1704.

David Hoyt

David was born in 1651and moved to Deerfield in 1678. On Apr. 3, 1673, he married Mary Wells of Hatfield. They had two children and Mary died sometime before Sept. of 1676. David then married Sarah Wilson in 1678 and had three children with her before she died around 1689. Around 1691 he married Abigail Cook Pomroy, the widow of Joshua Pomroy. David had three more children with her. In the 1704 attack, David, Abigail and two of their children were captured. Their third child was rumored to have hidden in a grain bin and escaped capture. David died of starvation in May of 1704 in Coos, NH, while still a captive. Abigail was redeemed and remarried. One captured child never returned and the other was killed on the journey north to Canada.

Abigail Cook Pomroy Hoyt

Abigail Cook was born around 1660. She was the widow of Joshua Pomroy when she married the widower David Hoyt around 1691. David already had three teenaged children and he and Abigail added three more children to the family. During the attack one of their children is said to have hidden in a grain bin and avoided capture. However, the rest of the family was captured. Abigail was the only one to return. She eventually married Nathaniel Rice of Wallingford, CT.

Abigail Hoyt (Jr.)

Abigail was the daughter of David and Abigail Cook Pomroy Hoyt. She was born on May 1, 1701, was captured during the 1704 attack and killed on the journey to Canada.

Jonathan Hoyt

Jonathan was born to David and Sarah Wilson Hoyt on Apr. 6, 1688. He was captured on Feb. 29, 1704, and taken to Lorette in Canada. In 1706, while in Quebec with his Native American master, he was spotted by two Englishmen who quickly purchased him for twenty silver dollars. He was then hurried on board a ship before his former master could change his mind. The master did regret his decision but too late. Jonathan returned to Deerfield and on June 26, 1712, he married Mary Field and had five children who lived to adulthood. Among other achievements, he served as a scout since he still spoke the Native language of his captors. His former master visited him so often that he petitioned the colony for funds to cover hosting expenses. Jonathan died on May 23, 1779.

Ebenezer Hoyt

Ebenezer was the son of David and Abigail Cook Pomroy Hoyt. He was born on Aug. 21, 1695, and captured during the 1704 raid. According to one account he never returned, but another states that he was killed on the journey to Canada.

Sarah Hoyt

Sarah Hoyt was born to David and Sarah Wilson Hoyt on May 6, 1686. She was captured during the 1704 attack and taken to Lorette in Canada, where she was being pressured to marry a Frenchman. She refused, but offered to marry any other fellow captive. Ebenezer Nims became her husband. By the time they were redeemed in 1714, Sarah and Ebenezer had a son. Leaving was made difficult because the priests and Native people who had adopted Ebenezer wished to keep them, or at least their child. The family did return to Deerfield and had four more children. Sarah died on Jan. 11, 1761.

Benjamin Hoyt

Benjamin was born to David and Abigail Cook Pomroy Hoyt on Sept. 15, 1691. It is believed that he escaped capture during the 1704 attack by hiding in a grain bin. He eventually moved to Ridgefield, CT, married and had at least two sons. He died before 1773.

Elizabeth Hull

Elizabeth was born December 23, 1688 to Jeremiah and Mehitable Smead Hull. Her father died when she was three. Seven months later her mother married Godfrey Nims. Elizabeth was taken captive, redeemed, and returned to Deerfield, where she married her stepbrother, John Nims, December 19, 1707. They had twelve children. She died in Deerfield September 21, 1754.

Benjamin Hurst

Benjamin (Benoni) was not yet two when taken captive and killed on route to Canada. He was born in Deerfield April 29, 1702, soon after his father, Thomas, had died. His mother, Sarah Jeffreys Hurst, also was captured along with five of her other children.

Ebenezer Hurst

Ebenezer was born in Deerfield May 7, 1698, the sixth child of Thomas and Sarah Jeffreys Hurst. He, his mother and five siblings were taken captive. The youngest, Benjamin, was killed on the march. In December, 1705, Ebenezer was baptized Antoine Nicholas whileliving with Jacques Charbonnier, a Montreal merchant. Ebenezer returned by ship to Boston in 1713. Nothing further is known of him.

Elizabeth Hurst

Elizabeth was born in Deerfield on August 15, 1687 to Thomas and Sarah Jeffreys Hurst. She was captured along with her mother and five siblings. Her youngest brother was killed on the march north. Records show that she married a Newfoundland captive, Thomas Becroft, on October 3, 1712 in the parish town of Villemarie. Elizabeth and Thomas had two children in Montreal in 1713 and 1714. They subsequently disappeared from the historical record, but evidence suggests that she returned to New England.

Hannah Hurst

Hannah, born in Deerfield on May 26, 1695, was the daughter of Thomas and Sarah Jeffreys Hurst. She was captured with her mother, three brothers, and two sisters. Hannah never returned home. She was naturalized as a French citizen in 1710. Baptized Marie Kaiennonni, she married Michel Anenharison on June 4, 1712, and chose to live her life as an Indian with the Iroquois of the Mountain. There is a record of one child, Simon, born to the couple in September 1719.

Sarah Jeffreys Hurst

Sarah Jeffreys married Thomas Hurst, one of the early settlers of Deerfield. They had seven children, one of whom died in infancy. Her husband died on February 9, 1702. Sarah and her six children were taken captive in the raid. Benjamin, the youngest, was killed on the march. In Canada, Sarah converted to Catholicism, became a naturalized French citizen, and married William Perkins in 1710. He was an Englishman, taken captive in Newfoundland. On September 21, 1714 she arrived by ship in Boston, along with twenty-five other released captives.

Sarah Hurst

Sarah was the eldest child of Thomas and Sarah Jeffreys Hurst. She was born in Deerfield July 26, 1685. She was forced into captivity with her mother, three brothers, and two sisters. Sarah was one among many Deerfield captives looked after by Montreal's elite families. She was redeemed and returned to New England.

Thomas Hurst

Thomas, born in Deerfield on June 12, 1691 to Thomas and Sarah Jeffreys Hurst, was captured with his mother and five siblings. Benjamin, the youngest, was killed on the trek north. Thomas was ransomed from the Iroquois and lived at the Lorette Mission in Montreal. Thomas never returned to New England. Upon his conversion to Catholicism and marriage, he was given land, taught the carpentry trade, and loaned money for a house, clothing, and tools. Records show that Thomas married Marie (Marguerite) Thibaud. A year after her death in 1717, he married Marie Francoise Rouleau. They had six children. Thomas died in about 1741.

Joseph Ingersoll

Joseph was a twenty-eight year old garrison soldier stationed in Deerfield. He was one of two known garrison soldiers who died in the village during the attack.

Jonathan Ingram

Jonathan was from Hadley, MA. He was one of nine soldiers slain in the Meadows Fight, as he pursued the French and Indians as they withdrew from Deerfield.

Joanna Kellogg

Joanna was born in Deerfield on February 8, 1693 to Martin and Sarah Dickinson Kellogg. In the 1704 raid she, her two brothers, and sister were taken captive and her brother Jonathan was killed. Rebecca married an Indian chief at Kahnawake and never returned to live in New England. She visited her brother near Wethersfield, CT, accompanied by her seven children. Despite inducements to remain, she returned to live out her life in Canada.

Jonathan Kellogg

Jonathan's parents were Martin and Sarah Dickinson Kellogg. He was born in Deerfield on December 17, 1698. Jonathan was killed in the attack. His father, two brothers, and two sisters were taken captive.

Joseph Kellogg

Joseph was born in Deerfield November 5, 1691, to Martin and Sarah Dickinson Kellogg. He was taken captive along with one brother and two sisters. Another brother was killed in the attack. Joseph remained in New France for ten years, traveling amongst the French and Indians as a warrior and fur trader. It is likely that he was the first Anglo-American to see the Mississippi River. In 1714 his brother Martin convinced him to return home with the promise of lucrative government work. That year he married Rachel Devotion, of Suffield, MA. They had five children. Joseph was named a Captain in 1723. He continued to serve as a soldier, diplomat, interpreter, and magistrate until his death in 1756.

Martin Kellogg

Martin, born 1658, was among the early permanent settlers of Deerfield. He married Anna Hinsdale July 19, 1689. After the birth of their second child, Anna died and Martin married Sarah Dickinson in 1691. They had four children. In the 1704 attack Martin was captured, his youngest son killed, and two sons and two daughters were forced into captivity. He was redeemed in 1705, and lived afterward in Suffield, CT. After Sarah's death in 1731, Martin took a third wife, Sarah Huxley.

Martin Kellogg (Jr.)

Martin, born October 26, 1686, was one of two children born to Martin Kellogg and his first wife, Anna Hinsdale. He was forced into captivity in 1704, along with a brother and two sisters. Martin escaped with three other Deerfield men, returning home on June 8, 1705. In August, 1708, he was captured again while on a scouting mission near Cowass. He remained among the French and Indians for several years, learning the languages of both. Upon return, the colony employed both Martin and his brother Joseph as messengers, interpreters, and spies. Martin married Dorothy Chester of Wethersfield, CT. They had a family of nine children. Martin died at Newington, CT on November 13, 1753.

Rebecca Kellogg

Rebecca was born in Deerfield December 22, 1695 to Martin and Sarah Dickinson Kellogg. She, her two brothers, and one sister were taken captive and her brother Jonathan was killed in the attack. She lived for many years at Kahnawake before reluctantly returning to New England. In 1745 she married Captain Benjamin Ashley, a teacher at the Stockbridge school, where she served as interpreter. She died in 1757 at the Iroquois village of Ouquaga.

John Marsh

John Marsh was a twenty-four year old militiaman from Hatfield. He was captured while pursuing the French and Native attackers as they withdrew from the town. John was later redeemed and returned home.

Philip Matoon

Philip was born to Philip and Sarah Hawks Matoon on April 4, 1680. He married Rebecca Nims of Deerfield on January 15, 1702. . His wife, and infant daughter were killed in the attack. Philip died on the journey north.

Rebecca Mattoon

Rebecca was the daughter of Godfrey and Mary Miller Nims, born August 14, 1679. She married Philip Mattoon January 15, 1703. Rebecca and her infant son were killed in the raid. Her husband was killed on the march north.

Sarah Mattoon

Sarah was born in Deerfield April 25, 1687 to Philip and Sarah Hawks Mattoon. She was taken captive and redeemed. Sarah later became engaged to Mathew Clesson, but he was killed by Indians in June of 1709. On December 31, 1711 she married Zechariah Field. Sarah and her husband were among a group of Deerfield residents who resettled Northfield, MA, after 1714. She bore nine children. Her husband died in 1746. Sarah married Samuel Childs in 1750 and died less than two years later, March 21, 1752.

Abigail Nims

Abigail was born in Deerfield on May 27, 1700. She was the daughter of Godfrey and Mehitable Smead Nims. Her family was devastated and her home burned in the 1704 attack. Abigail was taken captive and baptized Marie Elisabeth Naim, only four months after reaching Canada. Her brother John sought her redemption years later, but she refused to return with him to New England. On July 29, 1715 she married Deerfield captive Josiah Rising, renamed Ignace Raizenne. She and her husband raised eight children. Abigail remained in Canada, a devout Catholic. She died in February, 1748.

Ebenezer Nims

Ebenezer was born on March 14, 1687. His parents were Godfrey and Mary Miller Nims. He and his sister Abigail were taken captive. One brother and a sister were killed in the attack. Three of his sisters died were smothered in the cellar below their burning house. Their mother was killed on the march north. In captivity Ebenezer married the Deerfield captive Sarah Hoyt when she refused to be coerced into marriage with a Frenchman. The Reverend John Williams and Colonel Stoddard managed to bring the couple and their baby back to Deerfield in 1714. They had six children, all sons. Ebenezer died shortly before his wife, in about 1760.

Henry Nims

Henry was born April 20, 1682 to Godfrey and Mary Miller Nims. Henry was killed in the attack along with his sister Rebecca. Three sisters burned to death in their house after it was set on fire by members of the raiding party. One sister and two brothers were taken captive. His mother was killed on the march north and his father died soon after the attack.

Mary Nims

Mary, born on February 28, 1699 to Godfrey and Mehitable Smead Nims, died in the cellar of her burning house, along with her twin sister, Mercy, and older sister, Mehitable. One sister and two brothers were taken captive. Her mother was killed on the march north.Her father died soon after, in Deerfield.

Mehitable Smead Nims

Mehitable, born January 2, 1668, was the second wife of Godfrey Nims. They were married on June 27, 1692. She was the widow of Jeremiah Hull and daughter of William and Elizabeth Lawrence Smead. She gave birth to five children. Her son Thomas died in 1697, before turning five. Three of her daughters died in the cellar of the Nims burning house on the day of the attack. Mehitable and her youngest daughter Abigail were taken captive. Mehitable was killed on the fourth day of captivity. Abigail never returned to New England

Mehitable Nims

Mehitable perished in the cellar of her burning house, along with her sisters, Mary and Mercy.. Mehitable was born on May 16, 1696 to Godfrey and Mehitable Smead Nims. Three other siblings were taken captive. Her mother was killed on the march north. Her father died soon after the attack

Mercy Nims

Mercy, born February 28, 1699 to Godfrey and Mehitable Smead Nims, died in the cellar of her burning house, along with her twin sister, Mary, and older sister, Mehitable. Her family was devastated in the attack. Three siblings were taken captive, another two were killed, their mother was slain on the march, and their father died in Deerfield soon after.

Parthena

Like her husband, Frank, Parthena was an African slave belonging to the Reverend John Williams. Parthena was killed early inthe raid. He husband was taken captive and slain one day later. Nothing is known of her Parthena prior to her arrival in Deerfield.

Ensign René Boucher de la Perrière

Born in 1668, Ensign René Boucher de la Perrière was in his mid-thirties at the time of the 1704 raid. The attack on Deerfield was but one incident in a fifty-year-long military career. In the years following the 1704 raid, Boucher served in a variety of posts in western New France, including Fort Beauharnois, on the banks of the Missouri River. He also served as the commander of Fort St. Frederic (Crown Point.) Boucher was promoted to Lieutenant in 1710 and then to Captain in 1726. In 1736, the king awarded Boucher the Cross of St. Louis in recognition of his decades of devoted service to France. Despite his military honors, Boucher did not prosper financially. He endured illness and generally poor health for many years before dying in Montreal in 1742.

Joseph Petty

Joseph was born in 1672 to John and Ann Canning Petty. He married Elizabeth Edwards of Northampton on February 14, 1701. She died the following February, a week after childbirth. Joseph remarried Sarah Edwards on June 2, 1703. Both were taken captive in the Deerfield attack. Joseph escaped in May 1705 with Thomas Baker, John Nims, and Martin Kellogg. After a harrowing ordeal, he successfully returned to Deerfield on June 8, 1705. Joseph and Sarah had two children. The family relocated fter articles were drawn up in 1714 for the resettlement of Northfield. Years later, Joseph wrote an account of his escape, which he gave to Stephen Williams.

Sarah Petty

Born Sarah Edwards, she married Joseph Petty on June 2, 1703. She and Joseph were forced into captivity in 1704. Sarah was redeemed and Joseph escaped. Both returned to Deerfield. She gave birth to two children. Sometime after 1714, she and her family were among a group who left Deerfield to resettle Northfield, MA. She died there in 1754.

Esther Pomroy

Esther was the second wife of Joshua Pomroy. Both she and her husband were captured in the raid. She was killed on the march north.

Joshua Pomroy

Joshua was born September 24, 1675. He was the son of Joshua and Elizabeth Lyman Pomroy. He married Sarah Leonard May 1, 1700. After her death in 1702, Joshua married Esther, who was taken captive and killed. He and his sister Lydia were taken captive and redeemed. Upon his return to New England, he settled in Dorchester, MA and married twice more.

Lydia Pomroy

Lydia was born in Deerfield March 5, 1685, the daughter of Joshua and Elizabeth Lyman Pomroy. She and her brother Joshua were taken captive and redeemed. Lydia married Nathaniel Ponder of Westfield.

Samuel Price

Samuel was born about 1685. His parents were Robert and Mary Webb Price. He and his sister Elizabeth were captured. His sister Mary was killed. Samuel was baptized Louis Price. Samuel and his sister were naturalized as French citizens in 1710. He worked with his brother-in-law, John Forneau, as a shoemaker. The precise date of his return to New England is unknown. On April 7, 1714 he married Dorothy Fox. They settled in her hometown of Glastonbury, CT.

Sarah Price

Sarah was the daughter of John Webb of Northampton, MA. On Dec. 17, 1668, she married Zecheriah Field. They had two living children and she became a widow in 1674. Around 1677 she married Robert Price and together they had five children. Sarah was killed during the 1704 attack.

Jemima Richards

Jemima was the daughter of John Richards of New London, CT. John was a selectman and schoolmaster in Deerfield. Jemima was ten years old at the time of the attack. Her house burned and she was taken captive. She was killed during the first two days of captivity.

Josiah Rising

Josiah, the son of John of Suffield, CT and Sarah Hale of Windsor, CT, was born February 2, 1694. At the time of the attack he was living in Deerfield with his father's cousin, Mehuman Hinsdale. In captivity Josiah was baptized and given the name Ignace Raizenne. In 1715 he married 15-year-old Abigail Nims, also a Deerfield captive. At first they lived as both Iroquois and Catholics at the mission at Sault-au-Recollet, near Montreal. In 1721, the priests granted the couple a large tract of land near the Lac de Deux Montagnes. They raised eight children as devout Catholics.

Mercy Root

Mercy, born in 1689, was the daughter of Hezekiah and Mehitable Frary Root. At the time of the raid she was an orphan, living in Deerfield with her grandparents, Samson and Mary Daniels Frary. Both she and her grandfather died in the attack. Her grandmother was captured and killed on the march to Canada.

Jean Baptiste Hertel de Rouville

Jean-Baptiste Hertel de Rouville was born in 1668 in the French colony of New France. His father and his brothers all sought honor and advancement by serving as officers in the French Troupes de la Marine. Jean Baptiste was a 35-year old Lieutenant in the French troupes de la marine when he assumed command of the 300-plus member expedition against the English outpost of Deerfield in 1704. The raiding party apparently also included three or four brothers (probably René Hertel de Chambly, age 29; Lambert Hertel, age 27; Pierre Hertel de Moncours, age 17; and perhaps Michel Hertel, age 19.) Although he was wounded in the arm, Jean Baptiste survived the raid and returned to New France, where the French government rewarded his efforts by promoting him to captain. Hertel married twice. His first wife, Jeanne Dubois, died after two years of marriage in 1700. He was remarried in 1708 to Marie-Anne Baudouin, the daughter of a Quebec doctor. His father, Joseph-François was enobled in 1716, making the Hertel family the eleventh and final family in New France to receive this honor. The French Corwn rewarded Hertel's continued military service with the Cross of St. Louis in 1721. Jean-Baptiste Hertel de Rouville died the following year, at the age of 54.

Thomas Selden

Thomas was born November 12, 1677 to Thomas and Felix Lewis Selden, of Farmington, CT. His family settled in Deerfield when he was nine. Thomas was one of five garrison soldiers killed in the attack, one of two known to have died in the village.

Ebenezer Sheldon

Ebenzer was born in 1691, the son of John and Hannah Stebbins Sheldon. He, one brother, one sister, and his sister-in-law, were taken captive. His mother and youngest sister were killed in the attack. His father traveled to New France and secured his release in May 1705. He returned to the Old Indian House in Deerfield, where he ran a tavern. Ebenezer married Thankful Barnard, daughter of Deerfield resident Joseph Barnard. They had ten children. In 1735, the General Court granted to him and his sister, Mary, 300 acres of land. This was compensation for the expense of entertaining visiting Kahnawake Indians, their former captors, who made frequent visits to Deerfield. He relocated to Bernardston, MA, where he built Sheldon's Fort, serving as a lieutenant with four of his sons reporting to him. Ebenezer died on April 12, 1774.

Hannah Sheldon

Hannah, the daughter of John and Mary Munson Stebbins, was born in Northampton on July 8, 1664. At fifteen, she married Ensign John Sheldon of Deerfield. They had seven children,one of whom died in infancy. Hannah was killed in the 1704 raid when attackers fired through a hole hacked in what later became known as the "Old Indian House" door. Her eldest son escaped from a second story window. Her youngest daughter Mercy was killed on the doorstep. Three other children were taken captive. Her husband escaped unharmed.

Hannah Chapin Sheldon

Hannah, the daughter of Japhet Chapin of Springfield, MA, married John Sheldon Jr. on December 3, 1703. They jumped from their chamber window during the assault. Hannah injured her ankle and sent her husband off to Hatfield to enlist help. She was taken captive and lived with the French in Montreal until her father-in-law, Ensign John Sheldon, negotiated her release in May, 1705. Hannah returned to Deerfield, where she and John, Jr. had four children before her husband died in 1713. Hannah married Lieutenant Timothy Childs November 26, 1719. She lived to be eighty-five, dying on September 30, 1765.

Mary Sheldon

Mary was born in Deerfield on July 24, 1687 to John and Hannah Stebbins Sheldon. She, two brothers, and her sister-in-law were taken captive. Her mother and little sister were killed in the attack. On her father's second trip to New France in 1706, he was able to redeem Mary. She married her first husband, Samuel Clapp, of Northampton, in 1708. Her second husband was Jonathan Strong. Mary's Kahnawake "mother" often visited her in Northampton. In 1735, she and her brother Ebenezer were granted 300 acres as compensation for the expense of entertaining visiting Indians.

Mercy Sheldon

Mercy was John and Hannah Stebbins Sheldon's youngest child. She was born on August 25, 1701. In the attack Mercy was killed on the doorstep of the "Old Indian House." Her mother was shot dead, three siblings were taken captive, and her oldest brother escaped and ran to get help. Mercy's father was able to escape unharmed.

Remembrance Sheldon

Remembrance was born in Deerfield February 21, 1693, the son of John and Hannah Stebbins Sheldon. His mother and little sister Mercy were killed in the attack. Remembrance, one sister, one brother, and sister-in-law, were taken into captivity. He and his sister Mary were redeemed on May 30, 1706 through their father's negotiations. He went with his father to live in Hartford, CT. Remembrance married Hannah Drake of Windsor, Connecticut on February 19, 1719. They had five children.

John Smead

John was born in 1673. He married Anna Weld on Nov. 22, 1699, and they had one living child by 1704. During the attack he participated in the skirmish in the North Meadows and was wounded but escaped capture, as did the rest of his family. He and Anna had three more children before she died in 1712. He then married Abigail Brown on Dec. 31, 1714. John died on Apr. 30, 1720.

Anna Weld Smead

Anna was born to Daniel and Mary Hinsdale Weld on May 17, 1672. On Nov. 22, 1699, she married John Smead and by 1704 they had one living child. She and her family were not captured. Anna had three more children with John and died on Oct. 31, 1712.

John Smead (Jr.)

John was born on Sept. 23, 1702, to John and Anna Weld Smead. He and his family were not captured in 1704. He married Mary Allis on Sept. 26, 1723. By 1746, they had six living children. On Aug. 20 of that year John, his pregnant wife and five of their children were captured and taken to Canada. Two days later his daughter, "Captivity" was born. He and three of his children were redeemed in 1747. His wife and three children, including Captivity, died in Canada in 1747. Seven weeks after he returned, Native Americans killed John.

Samuel Smead

Samuel Smead was born in 1669. He married Sarah Price on Mar. 17, 1699, and together they had two children. During the 1704 attack his home was burned and his whole family plus his mother, Elizabeth, were smothered in the cellar. Smead was not captured. On Apr. 18, 1707, he married David Alexander's widow, Mary. They had four children who lived to adulthood. Samuel Smead died on Jan. 1, 1731.

Sarah Smead

Sarah was the daughter of Samuel and Sarah Price Smead. She was born on Feb. 25, 1700 and smothered in the cellar of her burning home during the 1704 attack.

William Smead

William was born on Dec. 16, 1701, to Samuel and Sarah Price Smead. His home was burned during the 1704 attack and he smothered in the cellar along with his sister and grandmother.

Elizabeth Smead

Elizabeth Smead came from Hingham, MA. She was the daughter of Thomas Lawrence. She married William Smead on Dec. 31, 1658. They had nine children. At the time of the 1704 attack, she was a widow with one daughter married to Godfrey Nims, another to John Hawks, and a third to Ebenezer Warner. All three daughters perished either during the 1704 attack or on the march to Canada. Mrs. Smead lived with her son Samuel and smothered in the cellar with two of his children when his home was burned.Martin Smith

Martin was one of the early settlers of Deerfield. He married Mary Phelps of Northampton on December 25, 1684. After she died in 1692, he remarried but was taken captive by Indians on October 13, 1693. Upon his return from captivity in late December of 1698, he found his second wife, Sarah, facing execution for the murder of her illegitimate child. Martin died died in John Hawk's cellar when the house above him burned in the 1704 raid.

Benoni Stebbins

Benoni was the son of John and Mary Munson Stebbins, born on June 23, 1655. As a youth he conspired to "run away to the French," but was caught and punished. Benoni fought in King Philip's War, and was captured by Indians but escaped in 1677. He was a Deerfield selectman, town assessor, and constable. Benoni married Mary Broughton in 1677. They had six children before she died in 1689. He had two more with his second wife, Hannah. Benoni built a fortified house on his father's house lot within the stockade. In the 1704 attack, seven men and a few women successfully defended the house for over two-and-a-half hours. Benoni was killed in that defense.

Dorothy Stebbins

Born Dorothy Alexander, she was the daughter of John Alexander of Newton, MA. Her house, situated north of the stockade, was burned and she and her entire family were taken captive. She, her husband, and eldest son returned to Deerfield. Her husband died in 1724. There is a record of her residing in Newton in 1733.

Ebenezer Stebbins

Ebenezer was born in Deerfield December 5, 1694. His parents were John Stebbins, one of the early Deerfield settlers, and Dorothy Alexander Stebbins of Newton. His entire family was taken captive and his home burned. Though seemingly inclined to return to New England, Ebenezer remained in New France. On June 29, 1708 he was baptized Jacques Charles. He lived at Boucherville with his sister Abigail, renamed Marguerite, and her French husband. Nothing is known of Ebenezer beyond his French naturalization in 1710.

John Stebbins

John was a carpenter and soldier. He is the only man known to have escaped unharmed from the 1675 attack at Bloody Brook in King Philip's War. He married Dorothy Alexander of Newton. They had six children. All were captured and their house, situated north of the stockade, was burned. It is believed that none were killed in the raid or on the march north because John's daughter Abigail had married a Frenchman, Jacques de Noyon. Five of John's children remained in Canada. Only John, his wife, and their eldest child returned before the war's end. He died in 1724, leaving a will that offered one-eighth of his lands to any of his children who would return to Deerfield. Only his son Samuel and his grandson Aaron took up the offer.

John Stebbins (Jr.)

John was born about 1685. His father, John, was an early English settler of Deerfield and his mother was Dorothy Alexander of Newton. He and his entire family were taken into captivity in the 1704 attack and their house was burned. John and his parents returned to Deerfield before the war's end. Five siblings remained in Canada for many years.

Joseph Stebbins

Joseph was born in Deerfield, April 12, 1699. He was the son of John Stebbins, one of the early Deerfield settlers, and Dorothy Alexander Stebbins of Newton. In the 1704 attack, his house burned and he, his parents, and all six children were taken captive. Joseph never came back to Deerfield, despite his father's offer of an eighth part of his lands were he to return. Joseph instead chose to remain in New France, where he married Marguerite Sanssoucy around 1734.The couple settled in Chambly, where they had eight children. Joseph died on April 23, 1753

Samuel Stebbins

Samuel was born December 25, 1688 to John Stebbins, one of the early Deerfield settlers, and Dorothy Alexander Stebbins of Newton. Samuel was taken captive with his parents, three brothers and two sisters. His home was burned. While in New France, he lived close by several siblings. Samuel remained in New France until 1728. He was lured back to Deerfield by his father's will, which offered him one-eighth of his father's lands on the condition that Samuel return.

Thankful Stebbins

Thankful was born in Deerfield on September 5, 1691 to John and Dorothy Alexander of Newton. She was taken captive with her entire family and her home was burned. Soon after her arrival at Chambly, she was ransomed from her Indian captors by Joseph Francois Hertel. On April 23, 1707 Thankful was baptized Louise Theresse Stebens. She married Charles-Adrien Legrain, called Lavalle, on February 4, 1711. She bore ten children, then died giving birth to the eleventh, in 1729.

Andrew Stevens

Andrew, "The Indian," married Deerfield resident Elizabeth Price on December 6, 1703. His origins are a mystery, but it seems likely that Andrew was an Englishman, who was a former captive, and had been baptized or renamed by the French. Andrew was killed inside the stockade. Elizabeth was taken captive and eventually married a Frenchman.

Elizabeth Price Stevens

Elizabeth was born on August 12, 1683, the daughter of Robert and Mary Webb Price. She married "the Indian," Andrew Stevens, on August 12, 1683. Andrew was killed in the attack on Deerfield. Both Elizabeth and her brother Samuel were captured. Her sister Mary was killed. Having few family ties remaining in Deerfield, Elizabeth converted to Catholicism and married Jean Fourneau on February 3, 1706. Fourneau was an ex-soldier turned shoemaker. She became a naturalized French subject in 1710 and had seven children. Elizabeth died, probably from childbirth complications, in November 1716.

Jacques-René Gaultier de Varennes

Jacques-René Gaultier de Varennes was the second son of Rene Gaultier de Varennes, the governor of Trois-Rivières in New France, and Marie Boucher. He married Marie Jeanne le Moyne de Sainte-Hélène in 1712. He accompanied his uncle, Ensign René Boucher de la Perrière on the 1704 raid. A twenty-seven-year-old cadet in the French troupes de la marine, Jacques-René survived the raid and was later promoted to Lieutenant. He married and settled in Montreal. After taking command of a military outpost on Lake Superior, he profited from the lucrative fur trade. He was promoted to Captain in 1736 and successfully placed his sons in the troupes de la marine. Later, however, he endured disgrace and the loss of his commission when the French government broke him for refusing to assist authorities in arresting his brother-in-law. Jacques-René died fourteen years later, at age eighty.

Pierre Gaultier de Varennes et de la Vèrendrye

Pierre Gaultier de Varennes et de la Vèrendrye was only nineteen when he joined the raiding party in 1704. One of twelve children, Pierre joined the French troupes de la marine and was a young cadet when he accompanied an uncle (Ensign René Boucher de la Perrière) and a brother (Jacques-René Gaultier de Varennes) on the raid on Deerfield in 1704. Like his uncle and brother, Pierre survived the attack. He served in the French army in Europe from 1706-09. He returned to New France and married. Pierre engaged in the fur trade as well as farming. Pierre gained fame for his activities in later years as an explorer. In his quest to find the illusory Northwest Passage to the western sea and in attempts to discharge his many debts, he established trading posts, contacted many Native peoples and extended French presence as far west as Lake Winnipeg. These feats brought fame rather than fortune; deeply in debt, Pierre returned to Montreal in 1744. He died five years later, at the age of sixty-four.

Benjamin Wait

Benjamin Wait was from Hatfield, MA. In 1677, his wife and three children were among thirty captives taken to Canada. Benjamin made the journey north and succeeded in rescuing all but three. On February 29, 1704 Benjamin was one of nine soldiers killed in the Meadows Fight, in pursuit of the withdrawing French and Indians.

Ebenezer Warner

Ebenezer was born in 1676 to Isaac and Sarah Boltwood Warner. He married Waitstill Smead on January 5, 1699. They had two daughters, Sarah and Waitstill. Ebenezer and his entire family were taken captive in the 1704 raid. He was redeemed, having been held in or near Quebec. In 1714 he made a return trip to New France, perhaps seeking the whereabouts of his daughter, Waitstill.

Nathaniel Warner

Nathaniel was from Hadley, MA. He was one of nine soldiers killed in the Meadows Fight, in pursuit of the withdrawing attackers.

Sarah Warner

Sarah, daughter of Ebenezer and Waitstill Smead Warner, was taken captive with her parents and two-year-old sister. Her pregnant mother was killed on the march. She and her father were redeemed.

Waitstill Smead Warner

Waitstill was pregnant at the time of the attack. She was taken captive and killed on the march north, being deemed too weary to continue. Her husband and two daughters were taken captive as well.

Waitstill Warner

Waitstill was two years old when taken captive with her parents and four-year-old sister Sarah. She was the daughter of Ebenezer and Waitstill Smead Warner. Her pregnant mother was killed on the march and her father and sister were redeemed. Waitstill's fate is unknown.

Daniel Weld

Daniel Weld was born on Sept. 25, 1642, and settled in Deerfield by 1673. On June 8, 1664, he married Mary Hinsdale. They had five children. During the attack one of his children, Mary Weld Alexander, was captured and later redeemed.

Mary Hinsdale Weld

Mary was the daughter of Robert and Ann Woodward Hinsdale. She was born on Feb. 14, 1644, and married Daniel Weld on June 8, 1664. One of her five children, Mary Weld Alexander, was taken captive in 1704 and was redeemed.

Mary Wells

Mary was born on November 12, 1673, the first child born to Thomas and Hepzibah Buel Wells. In June 1693 the Widow Wells and her three daughters, Thomas Broughton, his wife, and their three children were attacked by Indians. Only Mary and her mother survived. Mary was killed in the 1704 raid.

Esther Williams

Esther was born in Deerfield, April 10, 1691. Her parents were the Reverend John Williams and Eunice Mather Williams. Esther was taken captive with her parents and four siblings. Two young siblings were killed and her mother was slain two days into the march. Within weeks of her arrival in Canada, she was ransomed from the Indians by Governor Vaudreuil. John Sheldon secured Esther's release in May 1705. She was the first of her family to be redeemed. In 1715, Esther married the Reverend Joseph Meacham of Coventry, Connecticut.

Eunice Mather Williams

Eunice was married to the Reverend John Williams on July 21, 1687. She was the daughter of Northampton, MA minister, Eleazer Mather, and his wife Esther. In the 1704 attack, attackers killed two of her seven children Eunice was taken captive with her husband and five of her seven living children. Six-year-old John and six-week-old Jerusha were killed. Her house was burned. On the second day of captivity Eunice, weak from recent childbirth, was slain while attempting to cross the Green River.

Eunice Williams

Eunice was born in Deerfield on September 17, 1696 to the Reverend John Williams and Eunice Mather Williams. She was taken captive with her parents and four siblings. Two younger siblings were killed in the attack. Her mother was slain two days into the march north. Eunice was adopted into a Mohawk family at Kahnawake. Many attempts were made to redeem her, but she refused to return home. She stopped speaking English, was given the Indian name Kanenstenwahi, and married Arosen, a Mohawk Indian, in 1713. They had three children. In her adult life she made several visits to family members in New England, only once returning to Deerfield. Eunice lived to be ninety-five. She died November 26, 1785.

Jerusha Williams

Jerusha was born in Deerfield on January 15, 1704 to the Reverend John Williams and his wife Eunice Mather Williams. Jerusha and her six-year-old brother John were killed in the attack. Her parents and five remaining siblings were taken captive. Her mother was killed the second day of the march.

John Williams

John, son of Samuel and Theoda Parke Williams, was born on December 10, 1664 in Roxbury, MA. He graduated from Harvard College in 1683. In June, 1686 John Williams began preaching in Deerfield and was ordained on October 17, 1688. He married Eunice, the daughter of Northampton minister, Eleazer Mather. On February 29, 1704, John's youngest children, six-year-old John and six-week-old Jerusha, were killed. He, his wife, and their five remaining children were taken captive. His house was burned. On the second day of captivity John's wife, Eunice, was slain. After a brief stay at Odanak, Williams was ransomed from his Indian captors by Governor Vaudreuil. Though treated cordially by the French, he was not released until October, 1706. Four of his children were redeemed and returned. His daughter, Eunice, chose to remain with the Mohawks in Kahnawake. John Williams wrote an impassioned account of the 1704 raid and his resulting captivity titled, The Redeemed Captive Returning to Zion, published in 1707. It was an immediate bestseller. He returned to Deerfield and married Abigail Allen Bissell. They had five children. The Reverend Williams continued to serve as Deerfield's minister until his death on June 12, 1729.

John Williams (Jr.)

John was born on January 19, 1697 to the Reverend John Williams and his wife Eunice Mather Williams. He and his newborn sister Jerusha were killed in the attack. His parents and five remaining siblings were taken captive. His mother was killed the second day of captivity.

Stephen Williams

Stephen, son of the Reverend John Williams and Eunice Mather Williams, was born in Deerfield May 14, 1693. He and four siblings were forced into captivity along with their parents in the 1704 raid. His younger brother and infant sister were killed. Stephen's mother was slain two days into the march. He spent an arduous year with the Abenaki Indians before being ransomed to the French. In the summer of 1705, he was redeemed and returned home. Stephen wrote a narrative on his captivity shortly after his return. A graduate of Harvard College, he accepted a call to serve as the minister for Longmeadow, MA in 1716. Stephen married Abigail Davenport, of Stamford, CT. They had eight children. He served as chaplain on several English campaigns and expeditions. After Abigail's death in 1766, Stephen married the widow Sarah Chapin Burt. He died on June 10, 1782.

Warham Williams

Warham was born in Deerfield in September, 1699. He was the sixth child born to the Reverend John Williams and Eunice Mather Williams. In the 1704 raid he was taken captive along with his parents and four siblings. The two youngest, John and Jerusha, were killed in the attack. Warham's mother was slain on the second day of captivity. He was ransomed from his Indian captors by a French noblewoman. In the fall of 1706 Warham, his father, and brother Samuel were redeemed, arriving in Boston with fifty-four other English captives. Warham graduated from Harvard College, became the minister of Watertown, MA and married Abigail Leonard of Newton. They had seven children. Warham died on June 22, 1751.

John Wilton

Little is known of John Wilton, who was born in 1665. He was stationed in Deerfield as a garrison soldier and taken captive in the raid. By 1707 he was redeemed, and returned to New England.

Judah Wright

Judah was born in 1677, the son of Judah and Mercy Burt Wright. A weaver and garrison soldier, he was captured in 1704, redeemed, and settled in the Wapping section of Deerfield. On April 4, 1707 he married Mary Hoyt, daughter of David Hoyt. They had six children. Judah died in 1747.

Joseph Younglove

Joseph was the third husband of Mary Weld Alexander Smead. They were married on Nov. 28, 1734. Nothing more is known about him.

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