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English Songs from the 17th Century

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detail of folk dancers from painting 'Dixton Harvesters'

Psalm 137 - English Protestants in New England saw themselves as the spiritual heirs of the Hebrews of the Old Testament. This sense of identification was all the more powerful for John Williams and the other captives from Deerfield, who, like the ancient Hebrews described in the 137th Psalm, were forcibly taken into exile by their enemies. (duration: 3:56 minutes)

MP3 format (file size 4.8MB)

Text Transcript of song

Toss the Pot - This lighthearted drinking song celebrating the pleasures of good drink and fellowship reveals the important role the alehouse played in English community life. (duration: 2:23 minutes)

MP3 format (file size 3.0MB)

Text Transcript of song

Old 100 - Also known as "Psalm 100," this is perhaps the best known of the Old Testament psalms still sung in Christian churches to its original melody. Usually sung in unison as the doxology, in this earlier arrangement the tenor sings the plainsong, or melody. (duration: 1:55 minutes)

MP3 format (file size 2.4MB)

Text Transcript of song

A Cat Catch - Catches are elaborate rounds that interweave clever, often bawdy lyrics. Usually composed for three voices, catches were popular at the turn of the 18th century. Richard Brown's humorous A Cat Catch dates from this period. (duration: 1:46 minutes)

MP3 format (file size 2.2MB)

Text Transcript of song

Our Forefather's Song - Identified as America's first folk song, "Our Forefatherís Song", or "New England Annoyances", has been traced to 1643 New England. (duration: 1:54 minutes)

MP3 format (file size 2.4MB)

Text Transcript of song

 

Credits

These songs were sung by Honest Harmony, and engineered by Tony Jillson at Ratite Studios.

 

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