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Artifacts - Household Objects

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Click an artifact's image or name to view it.

Ceramic vessel
circa 1000 B.C.E - 350 B.C.E.
Producing ceramic objects like these is a specialized process usually associated with Native American agrarian societies.
Chest with Drawer
circa 1695 - 1710
This so-called "Hadley" chest was made about 1700 in Hatfield, Massachusetts, and was believed to have been owned by Rebecca Allis whose initials are carved on the center panel.
Copper Kettle
1645 - 1668
Copper kettles were welcome diplomatic gifts and valuable trade items.
Covered Basket
circa 1837
This covered basket is believed to have been made by Sophie Watso. She and several other Wôbanakiak from St. Francis, Québec, visited Deerfield, Massachusetts, in 1837.
Cradle
circa 1720
Cradles helped to keep infants warm in drafty houses and provided the soothing comfort of rocking to aid sleep.
Gateleg Table
1680 - 1720
Oval-leaf or drop-leaf tables, referred to today as gatelegs, could accommodate larger numbers of people by swinging out elaborately turned legs to hold up hinged drop leaves.
Great Chair
1700 - 1720
Great chairs or turned armchairs may have been reserved for the head of the household.
Hoyt Chest
1640 - 1680
This board chest, probably made in Windsor, Connecticut, descended in the Hoyt family living in Deerfield, Massachusetts, during the time of the 1704 raid on Deerfield.
Iron Kettle
circa 1690
This cast-iron kettle or cooking pot dates from the late 17th century.
Sheldon Chest
1699
This six-board chest from the home of John Sheldon in Deerfield, Massachusetts, served as a silent witness to the Deerfield raid of 1704.
Side Chair
1680 - 1720
This turned side chair was once owned by the Nims family of Deerfield, Massachusetts.
Steatite vessel
circa 7000 B.C.E - 3000 B.C.E
Steatite or soapstone bowls were water-tight and could be placed directly in a fire to cook stews and other foodstuffs.
Table
circa 1680 - 1730
This stretcher-based table from the Connecticut River Valley has a carved, single drawer.
Tapestry Cover
circa 1610 - 1615
The Reverend Edward Taylor (1642-1729) brought this richly decorated cushion cover with him from England in the 1660s.
Upholstered Side Chair
circa 1660 - 1680
Leather upholstery made this Cromwellian chair more costly than other side chairs. Seating furniture was rare in the early years of settlement, and a chair like this reflected the social and economic status of the owner.
Wooden Bowl
17th century
Native Americans made and used this wooden bowl during the 17th century.

 

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