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Artifacts - Military Objects

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Click an artifact's image or name to view it.

Atlatl

Atlatls were weights attached at the midway point on spears to increase their accuracy.
Bullet
1704
This lead bullet was found in a wall of the John Sheldon House following the 1704 raid on Deerfield, Massachusetts.
Bullet Pouch
circa 1750
This bullet pouch is made of deer hide, sinew, linen thread and porcupine quills.
Cartridge Box
circa 1690
Cartridge boxes or pouches, also called "belly boxes," were used to carry ammunition on belts.
Copper Arrowhead
circa 1625
Copper arrowheads or projectile points were among the earliest trade items in North America.
English Hatchet
circa 1690
A versatile tool as well as an edged weapon, the hatchet or belt axe served many functions.
Fowler
circa 1650
This robust and versatile long arm could be used as a military weapon or for hunting birds and small game.
French Bayonet
1670 - 1700
This 17th-century weapon was designed for use either as a bayonet at the end of a musket or as a hand-held dagger.
Knife
circa 1650 - 1675
This 17th-century knife was probably received by a Native American during trade with the French.
Pistol
1660 - 1680s
This English pistol, recovered from a shipwreck, dates from the second half of the 17th century.
Projectile point

Native Americans fashioned chert and flint into a variety of tools and points.
Sword Hilt
circa 1675
Swords were generally carried by officers and were a mark of social status and military rank.
Trade Gun
circa 1625 - 1650
This musket fragment is decorated with wampum beads set into both sides of the stock.
Tulle Musket
circa 1696
The Indian allies of the French were adequately armed for the raid on Deerfield in 1704. They may very well have carried a musket such as this one made at the Tulle factory in France.
War Club
circa 1750
The war club was a formidable weapon and was extremely useful in an ambush once the firearms were discharged. This weapon was deadly at close quarters, crippling even when poorly aimed.

 

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