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Teachers' Guide Main Menu | Lessons: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11
Lesson 1
We Both Want to Use This Land
Suggested Answers


a. The Pocumtucks might have liked the flat land for growing crops and traveling; being near the water for traveling and drinking water; having the woods nearby for lumber, firewood and houses; and game for hunting.

b. People are walking, canoeing, farming, burning the forest to clear it, living in houses.

c. The land is giving them wood, water, plants, game animals.

d. They made life easier by establishing trails, clearing the forest, building homes, and cultivating crops.

a. This is the same spot; the mountains and the river are the same.

b. The English might have liked the flat land for growing crops and traveling; being near the water for traveling and drinking water; having the woods nearby for lumber, firewood and houses; and game for hunting.

c. People are farming, walking, living in houses.

d.The land is giving them wood, water, plants, game animals.

e. They made life easier by establishing roads, building a town, building fences, establishing fields for crops.

a. Differences might include:

English view (1700)

  • A wall around the town
  • Homes all in one spot lined up as in a plan
  • People and animals working in the fields
  • Barns

Pocumtuck view (1550)

  • More trails
  • Canoes by the river
  • Woods being burned for clearing
  • A variety of smaller fields of corn hills
  • Houses more spread out over the landscape

b. The English built fences to protect what they owned. The Pocumtucks believed that land could not be "owned" because they believed that anyone could use it.

c. A person might travel from the woods to the river by crossing the English fields, which would involve climbing over their fences or, one might decide to go around the fields, which would take longer. The English would probably have been mad if you crossed their fields. One might tell them "This is the best way to the river and I will try to walk carefully."

d. A person might be mad if the English pigs got into their cornfield. They might complain to the English and ask them to keep their animals out of my corn. If the pigs ate a lot of it, they might ask the English to give them some of their corn. Someone else might decide that receiving pay from the English for damage to crops was good enough, but others might decide that more needed to be done such as fencing the pigs in, or killing those that trespassed (which could cause further problems).

e. The two groups might have lived together in the same spot if they had listened to each other better and both made some compromises, such as penning in livestock, or being willing to walk around fenced fields. Some might believe that the two groups could not have lived easily in the same spot.

What really happened was that most of the Pocumtucks left the area to live with other Native peoples. Those who stayed changed their way of life to be more like the English, so that the English would leave them alone.

 

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